World Press Photo Foundation@worldpressphoto

This week, #WPPh2018 Photo Contest winner @alessio_mamo takes over our Instagram feed! All images selected by photographer.

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Manal photographed in her house in Kirkuk, on the 6th May 2018. Today she is living with her uncle surronded by her brothers and cousins, going to school near their house, while her mother is working in their hometown, Hawija. Even if victory over ISIS was declared last December 2017 in Iraq, many ISIS's cells are active in the Hamreen Hills between Kirkuk and Hawija and Iraqi Army is still fighting against them, especially in desert areas near Iraqi-Syrian border. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ My name is Alessio Mamo (@alessio_mamo) an Italian freelance photographer based in Catania, Sicily. In 2008 I began my career in photojournalism focusing on contemporary social, political and economic issues. I extensively cover issues related to refugee displacement and migration starting in Sicily, and extending most recently to the Middle East. I was awarded 2nd prize in the People Singles category of #WPPh2018 and this week I’m taking over World Press Photo's Instagram account. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ I want to finish my taking over of the World Press Photo's Instagram account with this special picture. This is our little heroine Manal in her house in Kirkuk, Iraq. She is back home and she is doing better. She is not wearing the mask anymore. Me and my colleague Marta Bellingreri visited her two months ago and told her about the World Press Photo award. We will meet Manal soon again in Autumn in Iraq, Inchalla! ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ #WPPh2018 #MSF #DoctorsWithoutBorders #Iraq #ReconstructiveSurgery #MiddleEast #Manal

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These photographs are from Uttar Pradesh and Madhya Pradesh two of the poorest states of India. From the series "Dreaming Food", a conceptual project about hunger issue in India. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ My name is Alessio Mamo (@alessio_mamo) an Italian freelance photographer based in Catania, Sicily. In 2008 I began my career in photojournalism focusing on contemporary social, political and economic issues. I extensively cover issues related to refugee displacement and migration starting in Sicily, and extending most recently to the Middle East. I was awarded 2nd prize in the People Singles category of #WPPh2018 and this week I’m taking over World Press Photo's Instagram account. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Despite economic growth, a majority of the Indian population still lives in extreme poverty and disease. Behind India’s new-found economic strength are 300 million poor people who live on less than $1 per day. Government figures may indicate a reduction in poverty. But the truth is, with increasing global food prices, poverty is spreading everywhere like a swarm of locusts. These pictures are taken in rural areas where conditions are worse than in the cities and where close to 70% of India’s population reside today. Statistics show that 2.1 million children under 5 years old die of malnutrition annually. The idea of this project was born after reading the statistics of how much food is thrown away in the West, especially during Christmas time. I brought with me a table and some fake food, and I told people to dream about some food that they would like to find on their table. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ #WPPh2018#asia #dreamingfood #india

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Women and children attend Sunday’s celebration in a big caravan-constructed-church in Ozal camp, near Erbil. Together, they hope and pray to return to their home cities in Ninive region, whose capital is Mosul, recently liberated by the group IS. From the series "Displaced Worshippers". ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ My name is Alessio Mamo (@alessio_mamo) an Italian freelance photographer based in Catania, Sicily. In 2008 I began my career in photojournalism focusing on contemporary social, political and economic issues. I extensively cover issues related to refugee displacement and migration starting in Sicily, and extending most recently to the Middle East. I was awarded 2nd prize in the People Singles category of #WPPh2018 and this week I’m taking over World Press Photo's Instagram account. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Churches in the displaced camps are always full during Mass Celebration on Sundays. Abuna (Father) Georges, a priest from Qaraqosh, is there to serve his community, after years in Italy. Christian and Assyrian communities of Mosul, Qaraqosh, Bertella and Beshika escaped from ISIS in 2014, mostly towards Kurdistan Region in Iraq, living in camps or in houses and often in precarious conditions. They have built though their own churches in the displaced camps. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Many of them come from Qaraqosh, the largest Christian town in Iraq, which has been occupied by Daesh (Arabic acronym for ISIS) the night of 6th August 2014 and then liberated by Iraqi army in late October 2016. But the former population of 50,000 people cannot still go back, except for small groups with a special permit, because the city has been largely devasted. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Displaced worshipper is a journey through their religious celebrations, the displacement and the resilience in facing devastation and the ISIS’s tentative of annihilation, resisting as Christian minority in a still far to reconcile and to stabilize Iraq. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ #WPPh2018 #Iraq #MiddleEast #christians #displaced

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Caravel left intact in a living room ransacked and robbed. Qaraqosh, largest Christian town in Iraq, has been liberated from ISIS by the Iraqi army in October 2016, after two years of occupation, and it shows signs of complete devastation. From the series "Displaced Worshippers". ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ My name is Alessio Mamo (@alessio_mamo) an Italian freelance photographer based in Catania, Sicily. In 2008 I began my career in photojournalism focusing on contemporary social, political and economic issues. I extensively cover issues related to refugee displacement and migration starting in Sicily, and extending most recently to the Middle East. I was awarded 2nd prize in the People Singles category of #WPPh2018 and this week I’m taking over World Press Photo's Instagram account. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Churches in the displaced camps are always full during Mass Celebration on Sundays. Abuna (Father) Georges, a priest from Qaraqosh, is there to serve his community, after years in Italy. Christian and Assyrian communities of Mosul, Qaraqosh, Bertella and Beshika escaped from ISIS in 2014, mostly towards Kurdistan Region in Iraq, living in camps or in houses and often in precarious conditions. They have built though their own churches in the displaced camps. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Many of them come from Qaraqosh, the largest Christian town in Iraq, which has been occupied by Daesh (Arabic acronym for ISIS) the night of 6th August 2014 and then liberated by Iraqi army in late October 2016. But the former population of 50,000 people cannot still go back, except for small groups with a special permit, because the city has been largely devasted. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Displaced worshipper is a journey through their religious celebrations, the displacement and the resilience in facing devastation and the ISIS’s tentative of annihilation, resisting as Christian minority in a still far to reconcile and to stabilize Iraq. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ #WPPh2018 #Iraq #MiddleEast #christians #displaced

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The hill at the entrance of Karemlesh, over the Church of the Holy Saint Mart Barbara. The small town, situated 29 km south of Mosul, is close by Qaraqosh. In the picture, next to the cross and the Iraqi flag, the Christian Assyrian militia NPU (Niniveh Plain Protection UNits) flag, stands as well. From this point two former residents are taking pictures of the view at all the Niniveh Plain. From the series "Displaced Worshippers". ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ My name is Alessio Mamo (@alessio_mamo) an Italian freelance photographer based in Catania, Sicily. In 2008 I began my career in photojournalism focusing on contemporary social, political and economic issues. I extensively cover issues related to refugee displacement and migration starting in Sicily, and extending most recently to the Middle East. I was awarded 2nd prize in the People Singles category of #WPPh2018 and this week I’m taking over World Press Photo's Instagram account. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Churches in the displaced camps are always full during Mass Celebration on Sundays. Abuna (Father) Georges, a priest from Qaraqosh, is there to serve his community, after years in Italy. Christian and Assyrian communities of Mosul, Qaraqosh, Bertella and Beshika escaped from ISIS in 2014, mostly towards Kurdistan Region in Iraq, living in camps or in houses and often in precarious conditions. They have built though their own churches in the displaced camps. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Many of them come from Qaraqosh, the largest Christian town in Iraq, which has been occupied by Daesh (Arabic acronym for ISIS) the night of 6th August 2014 and then liberated by Iraqi army in late October 2016. But the former population of 50,000 people cannot still go back, except for small groups with a special permit, because the city has been largely devasted. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Displaced worshipper is a journey through their religious celebrations, the displacement and the resilience in facing devastation and the ISIS’s tentative of annihilation, resisting as Christian minority in a still far to reconcile and to stabilize Iraq. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ #WPPh2018 #Iraq #MiddleEast #christians #displaced

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Two hundred children of Ainkawa’s camp in Erbil take their first Holy Communion on Corpus Domini’s day, the Feast of Corpus Christ. From the series "Displaced Worshippers". ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ My name is Alessio Mamo (@alessio_mamo) an Italian freelance photographer based in Catania, Sicily. In 2008 I began my career in photojournalism focusing on contemporary social, political and economic issues. I extensively cover issues related to refugee displacement and migration starting in Sicily, and extending most recently to the Middle East. I was awarded 2nd prize in the People Singles category of #WPPh2018 and this week I’m taking over World Press Photo's Instagram account. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Churches in the displaced camps are always full during Mass Celebration on Sundays. Abuna (Father) Georges, a priest from Qaraqosh, is there to serve his community, after years in Italy. Christian and Assyrian communities of Mosul, Qaraqosh, Bertella and Beshika escaped from ISIS in 2014, mostly towards Kurdistan Region in Iraq, living in camps or in houses and often in precarious conditions. They have built though their own churches in the displaced camps. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Many of them come from Qaraqosh, the largest Christian town in Iraq, which has been occupied by Daesh (Arabic acronym for ISIS) the night of 6th August 2014 and then liberated by Iraqi army in late October 2016. But the former population of 50,000 people cannot still go back, except for small groups with a special permit, because the city has been largely devasted. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Displaced worshipper is a journey through their religious celebrations, the displacement and the resilience in facing devastation and the ISIS’s tentative of annihilation, resisting as Christian minority in a still far to reconcile and to stabilize Iraq. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ #WPPh2018 #Iraq #MiddleEast #christians #displaced

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The tower bell of Saint Banham and Saint Sara Church, an Aramean Syrian Catholic Church, destroyed by ISIS. An Iraqi soldier is ringing the bell which fell down in the tower's destruction. From the series "Displaced Worshippers". ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ My name is Alessio Mamo (@alessio_mamo) an Italian freelance photographer based in Catania, Sicily. In 2008 I began my career in photojournalism focusing on contemporary social, political and economic issues. I extensively cover issues related to refugee displacement and migration starting in Sicily, and extending most recently to the Middle East. I was awarded 2nd prize in the People Singles category of #WPPh2018 and this week I’m taking over World Press Photo's Instagram account. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Churches in the displaced camps are always full during Mass Celebration on Sundays. Abuna (Father) Georges, a priest from Qaraqosh, is there to serve his community, after years in Italy. Christian and Assyrian communities of Mosul, Qaraqosh, Bertella and Beshika escaped from ISIS in 2014, mostly towards Kurdistan Region in Iraq, living in camps or in houses and often in precarious conditions. They have built though their own churches in the displaced camps. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Many of them come from Qaraqosh, the largest Christian town in Iraq, which has been occupied by Daesh (Arabic acronym for ISIS) the night of 6th August 2014 and then liberated by Iraqi army in late October 2016. But the former population of 50,000 people cannot still go back, except for small groups with a special permit, because the city has been largely devasted. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Displaced worshipper is a journey through their religious celebrations, the displacement and the resilience in facing devastation and the ISIS’s tentative of annihilation, resisting as Christian minority in a still far to reconcile and to stabilize Iraq. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ #WPPh2018 #Iraq #MiddleEast #christians #displaced

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Women walk out of Ainkawa Displaced Camp’s Church after Sunday’s celebration. Christian Iraqis, from the city of Qaraqosh in Mosul’s province, escaped IS on the night of 6th August 2014. From the series "Displaced Worshippers". ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ My name is Alessio Mamo (@alessio_mamo) an Italian freelance photographer based in Catania, Sicily. In 2008 I began my career in photojournalism focusing on contemporary social, political and economic issues. I extensively cover issues related to refugee displacement and migration starting in Sicily, and extending most recently to the Middle East. I was awarded 2nd prize in the People Singles category of #WPPh2018 and this week I’m taking over World Press Photo's Instagram account. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Churches in the displaced camps are always full during Mass Celebration on Sundays. Abuna (Father) Georges, a priest from Qaraqosh, is there to serve his community, after years in Italy. Christian and Assyrian communities of Mosul, Qaraqosh, Bertella and Beshika escaped from ISIS in 2014, mostly towards Kurdistan Region in Iraq, living in camps or in houses and often in precarious conditions. They have built though their own churches in the displaced camps. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Many of them come from Qaraqosh, the largest Christian town in Iraq, which has been occupied by Daesh (Arabic acronym for ISIS) the night of 6th August 2014 and then liberated by Iraqi army in late October 2016. But the former population of 50,000 people cannot still go back, except for small groups with a special permit, because the city has been largely devasted. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Displaced worshipper is a journey through their religious celebrations, the displacement and the resilience in facing devastation and the ISIS’s tentative of annihilation, resisting as Christian minority in a still far to reconcile and to stabilize Iraq. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ #WPPh2018 #Iraq #MiddleEast #christians #displaced

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The film director Deema Dabis is also a fire performer. Her short film “Shake” tells the (autobiographical) story of a Palestinian-American woman interrogated, humiliated and denied entry at Israeli border. In this photo she is performing at the Skate Park in Amman. From the series "Female Artists in Jordan". ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ My name is Alessio Mamo (@alessio_mamo) an Italian freelance photographer based in Catania, Sicily. In 2008 I began my career in photojournalism focusing on contemporary social, political and economic issues. I extensively cover issues related to refugee displacement and migration starting in Sicily, and extending most recently to the Middle East. I was awarded 2nd prize in the People Singles category of #WPPh2018 and this week I’m taking over World Press Photo's Instagram account. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Women artists in Jordan feed the cultural life in the capital Amman with their creative initiatives and independent art spaces. Through their art projects and cultural practices, they have created platforms within which traditional gender roles are challenged and reimagined against a mostly conservative patriarchal society. While neighboring countries are burning in turmoil and crisis, the so-called “Kingdom of Peace” lives in a precarious stability in which the arts scene is growing. In this context, women artists engage with the visual arts in informal domains rather than in institutionalized contexts which are mostly “male-dominated”. This photo portraits series follows the women artists’ itineraries, performed spaces, collective practices, urban personal stories and individual or common artworks. It captures their projected artistic personas which are being influenced and are in turn influencing the rapidly modernizing society they occupy. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ #WPPh2018 #Jordan #Amman #art #artists #female #women #MiddleEast

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The storyteller Sally Shalabi in Jabal al-Qala'a, Amman. As a female storyteller, she changed her stage surname, Shalabieh, by feminizing her family name, Shalabi. She also refers to herself professionally as 'hakawatieh', a feminine version of the word hakawaty, which means storyteller. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ My name is Alessio Mamo (@alessio_mamo) an Italian freelance photographer based in Catania, Sicily. In 2008 I began my career in photojournalism focusing on contemporary social, political and economic issues. I extensively cover issues related to refugee displacement and migration starting in Sicily, and extending most recently to the Middle East. I was awarded 2nd prize in the People Singles category of #WPPh2018 and this week I’m taking over World Press Photo's Instagram account. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Women artists in Jordan feed the cultural life in the capital Amman with their creative initiatives and independent art spaces. Through their art projects and cultural practices, they have created platforms within which traditional gender roles are challenged and reimagined against a mostly conservative patriarchal society. While neighboring countries are burning in turmoil and crisis, the so-called “Kingdom of Peace” lives in a precarious stability in which the arts scene is growing. In this context, women artists engage with the visual arts in informal domains rather than in institutionalized contexts which are mostly “male-dominated”. This photo portraits series follows the women artists’ itineraries, performed spaces, collective practices, urban personal stories and individual or common artworks. It captures their projected artistic personas which are being influenced and are in turn influencing the rapidly modernizing society they occupy. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ #WPPh2018 #Jordan #Amman #art #artists #female #women #MiddleEast

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The photographer Linda Khoury is the founder in Amman of Darat al-Tasweer, the House of Photography, and the director of the @imagefestivalamman, the International Festival of Photography in Jordan. In this picture, she is portrayed in the first-class train wagon at the old Hijaz Railway Station in Amman. From the series "Female Artists in Jordan". ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ My name is Alessio Mamo (@alessio_mamo) an Italian freelance photographer based in Catania, Sicily. In 2008 I began my career in photojournalism focusing on contemporary social, political and economic issues. I extensively cover issues related to refugee displacement and migration starting in Sicily, and extending most recently to the Middle East. I was awarded 2nd prize in the People Singles category of #WPPh2018 and this week I’m taking over World Press Photo's Instagram account. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Women artists in Jordan feed the cultural life in the capital Amman with their creative initiatives and independent art spaces. Through their art projects and cultural practices, they have created platforms within which traditional gender roles are challenged and reimagined against a mostly conservative patriarchal society. While neighboring countries are burning in turmoil and crisis, the so-called “Kingdom of Peace” lives in a precarious stability in which the arts scene is growing. In this context, women artists engage with the visual arts in informal domains rather than in institutionalized contexts which are mostly “male-dominated”. This photo portraits series follows the women artists’ itineraries, performed spaces, collective practices, urban personal stories and individual or common artworks. It captures their projected artistic personas which are being influenced and are in turn influencing the rapidly modernizing society they occupy. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ #WPPh2018 #Jordan #Amman #art #artists #female #women #MiddleEast

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Yara Hindawi, a graffiti artist from Amman, often draws ghosts in the city with her tag “Yaratun”. These ghosts have different face expressions and feelings but not a political meaning in her views, here at Rainbow street, Jabal Amman. From the series "Female Artists in Jordan". ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ My name is Alessio Mamo (@alessio_mamo) an Italian freelance photographer based in Catania, Sicily. In 2008 I began my career in photojournalism focusing on contemporary social, political and economic issues. I extensively cover issues related to refugee displacement and migration starting in Sicily, and extending most recently to the Middle East. I was awarded 2nd prize in the People Singles category of #WPPh2018 and this week I’m taking over World Press Photo's Instagram account. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Women artists in Jordan feed the cultural life in the capital Amman with their creative initiatives and independent art spaces. Through their art projects and cultural practices, they have created platforms within which traditional gender roles are challenged and reimagined against a mostly conservative patriarchal society. While neighboring countries are burning in turmoil and crisis, the so-called “Kingdom of Peace” lives in a precarious stability in which the arts scene is growing. In this context, women artists engage with the visual arts in informal domains rather than in institutionalized contexts which are mostly “male-dominated”. This photo portraits series follows the women artists’ itineraries, performed spaces, collective practices, urban personal stories and individual or common artworks. It captures their projected artistic personas which are being influenced and are in turn influencing the rapidly modernizing society they occupy. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ #WPPh2018 #Jordan #Amman #art #artists #female #women #MiddleEast

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